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Rating

Graphics

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Each area has a cartoonish design, with various realistic aspects. It's easy to see that only someone who actually battles the diseases can come up with the imagination and design behind this game.

Sound

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Sound effects are minimal but suit the cyber-health atmosphere of the game. There is no music, which is, in my opinion, better because you can focus on the game and it really feels like you're flying through a cybernetic void or a human body.

Gameplay

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Various weapons and cures are available throughout each level, which are a great help when fighting cancerous cells. To beat each level, first you must fight the boss, destroy the hundreds of cancerous cells, then collect the shield.

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The Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation® is a charitable non-profit organization whose purpose is to fulfill magical wishes for children with life-threatening illnesses. Now the sixth largest chapter nationwide, the Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation has granted over 2,800 wishes as of 2002. One day a letter came into the center from a boy named Ben Duskin, who had a very unusual wish. As a great lover of the video games which helped him cope with the harsh chemotherapy he had to endure to help treat his leukemia, Ben’s wish would not seem surprising to those who knew him. His wish was to create a video game to help give hope to the thousands of children suffering from life-threatening diseases. The Make-A-Wish Foundation hired Lucasarts Ltd. employee Eric Johnston to help Ben make his game, titled Ben’s Game.

In Ben’s Game, the object of the game is to fight the cancerous cells in each area of the body and find the seven shields which help combat disease. Traveling through veins connected to the heart, your character arrives at different locales in the body, where he, she, or it must fact seven deadly viruses which guard each shield. With a slew of weapons, available in bubbles around each level, these cancers don’t stand a chance.

The level designs are not really varied, but that doesn’t make them any less cool. Each area has a cartoonish design, with various realistic aspects within. It's plain to see the imagination and design behind this game are something only someone who actually battles the diseases can create. From the cells which scurry around the floor, to the cardboard cutout characters which you control, to the varied bosses, there’s a message of truth in everything combined with a comedic edge to lighten spirits. Heck, the boss that represents chicken pox is an actual chicken. Some of the characters you play as are quite funny as well. You can play as an alien, a dog, a monkey, or just regular kids. That’s up to your personal preference. Various weapons and cures are available in bubbles throughout each level, which will be a great help when fighting cancerous cells. To beat each level, first you must fight the boss, destroy the hundreds of cancerous cells, then collect the shield. You can’t die, you just power down. According to Ben, this is meant to mean that in a fight against disease, you can’t ever give up.

Along with fun gameplay that completes itself with a powerful message, I must say that this game is truly deserving of a straight five. Not only is it professional, it's free, it's there to give hope, and if you don’t pick it up now, then you just don’t know a great game when you see one. So grab this hope giving video game before the cancers bop you upside the head.


Review by: Secret Fawful